All posts filed under: Literature

Revisiting “The Lorax,” Original Animation from 1972

As I’m sure many people are aware, the beloved story by Dr. Seuss “The Lorax” was remade in 2012 by Universal Pictures. I didn’t see this new version, but I certainly remember seeing the original animation from 1972 even though I wasn’t born until much later. I don’t remember where I saw it, whether it was at home or perhaps they showed it to us at school – it didn’t tend to garner the same repeat airtime that “The Grinch Who Stole Christmas” original animation did during the Holiday season. Still, I recall the watching experience as an enjoyable one. I specifically remember the part where the little boy is going to see the Onceler – the long green covered arms, the creaky window, and the platform of stones. Everything is dark, no brightly covered Truffula trees yet. What I didn’t remember was how well done this animation truly is. I don’t consider myself an animation connoisseur by any means and so I am quick to present admonition. Perhaps it’s just a yearning for the …

An Awesome Speech About Life, Love, What Success Means, and Above All – Kindness

George Saunders gave the commencement speech at Syracuse University. It was published by the Times and it’s absolutely a lovely speech full of good intention and funny quips. I highly recommend you read it from it’s original source here. Who is George Saunders? “George Saunders is a New York Times bestselling American writer of short stories, essays, novellas and children’s books. His writing has notably appeared in The New Yorker, Harper’s, McSweeney’s and GQ.” – Wikipedia If you’re not convinced here are some of my favorite parts: “So: What do I regret?  Being poor from time to time?  Not really.  Working terrible jobs, like “knuckle-puller in a slaughterhouse?”  (And don’t even ASK what that entails.)  No.  I don’t regret that.  Skinny-dipping in a river in Sumatra, a little buzzed, and looking up and seeing like 300 monkeys sitting on a pipeline, pooping down into the river, the river in which I was swimming, with my mouth open, naked?  And getting deathly ill afterwards, and staying sick for the next seven months?  Not so much.  Do …

Video: This Is Water, An Epic Speech From David Foster Wallace

I’ve just started reading Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace. It’s big, it’s wordy, it’s daunting, and it’s a bit slow in the beginning. This video of David Foster Wallace’s 2005 commencement speech to Kenyon College is so relevant in so many ways. First of all it’s beautifully done, but it is also a very comprehensive statement about the true meaning of being “well-educated.” So many people go to expensive schools and get degrees but haven’t learned anything about the world being greater than themselves or thinking about where other people are coming from, altruism and empathy. I’m in no way perfect. I obviously get annoyed with people, am self-centered etc. But I do find that when people think the worst of a stranger I do counter with, “how do you know they didn’t just have the worst day? How do you know their mom didn’t die or they’re not struggling to make ends meet?” That’s why I always tip waiters and waitresses even if they’re terrible to me. Maybe they are a genuinely terrible …

In Love with ‘Love in the Time of Cholera’

Only on those occasions, and others of equal urgency, did he realize the truth of words that he liked to repeat in jest: ‘I do not believe in God, but I am afraid of Him.’” p. 304 I’ve been trying to catch up on some reading while in Turkey including Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s Love in the Time of Cholera. Several factors point to the conclusion that everything Gabriel Garcia Marquez creates is literary gold: He is the first Columbian and fourth Latin American to ever win the Nobel Prize for Literature, he arguably popularized Magical Realism, and One Hundred Years of Solitude is 432 pages of beauty. Despite these obvious accolades, I couldn’t imagine any of his other novels being as poignant, enlightening, articulate, or magical after reading 100 Years of Solitude. Additionally I was annoyed that the book cost me a whopping $15.00 for some paper (I could have a new dress for that price). But of course, it was worth it and I now intend to (slowly) make my way through his entire life …